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Walmart

Goal 2: End Hunger

2.1)   By 2030, end hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular the poor and people in vulnerable situations including infants, to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round

Walmart has set a number of goals to contribute to ending hunger.  First, it aspires to provide 4 billion meals to those who need them in the U.S. from 2015 to 2020 via grants from the Walmart Foundation and food donations from our Walmart stores, Sam’s Clubs and distribution centers. Thus far, 1.1 billion meals have been provided and $61 million has been contributed to organizations.  Second, it aspired to open between 275-300 stores in “food deserts” in the U.S. by 2016; by the end of FY2015, 375 stores serving food deserts were opened across the U.S.

2.3)   By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment

As the world's largest food retailer, Walmart works with suppliers and many others along the food chain to strengthen sustainability – creating a food system that is more affordable for people and planet, more accessible for all, healthier, safer and more transparent. Walmart and the Walmart Foundation are committed to training 1 million farmers and farm workers by the end of 2016. To date, Walmart and the Walmart Foundation have contributed to training  564,321 farm workers, 297,655 of whom were women (also see Target 5.5).

Goal 5: Achieve Gender Equality

5.5)   Ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic, and public life

Walmart aspires to train 1 million women around the world in agriculture, manufacturing and retail trade in emerging markets to elevate women to not only strengthen their families and communities, but also improve the health of supply chains and promote economic growth.  By the end of FY2015, the Walmart Foundation and Walmart contributed funding to train 540,102 women globally, 297,655 of them in the agriculture value chain. Beyond agriculture, Walmart also aspires to train an additional 200,000 women for their first jobs in retail in emerging markets by the end of 2016; by the end of 2014, 13,295 women in eight countries received retail training. Walmart also seeks by the end of 2016 to help 60,000 women working in factories develop the skills they need to become more active decision-makers in their jobs and for their families; by the end of 2014, the Women in Factories program had trained 48,729 women in foundational training for life and work skills in 82 factories in Bangladesh, China, El Salvador, Honduras and India.  Of those women, 2,546 completed advanced training. Since the launch of the Women’s Economic Empowerment initiative, 180,423 U.S. women from low-income households have received support through programs funded by the Walmart Foundation. 

Additionally, since 2011, Walmart has sourced $11.24 billion in products and services from U.S. women-owned businesses (WOB), including $4.16 billion in FY2015, moving quickly towards our goal of sourcing $20 billion through 2016. In five tracked international markets, Walmart has increased annual spend on WOB by more than 21 percent from FY2012 to FY2015.

Goal 7: Ensure Energy for All

7.3)   By 2030, double the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency

Walmart aspires to reduce their energy consumption by 20 percent per square foot by 2020 compared with the 2010 baseline and work their way toward being powered 100 percent by renewable energy (they are at 26 percent) as well as double the fuel efficiency of our fleet (they've improved efficiency by 87.4 percent since 2005).

Goal 8: Promote Economic Growth & Decent Work

8.3)   Promote development-oriented policies that support productive activities, decent job creation, entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation, and encourage formalization and growth of micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises, including through access to financial resources

In 2013, Walmart launched the platform Empowering Women Together (EWT) to provide opportunities to small businesses with less than $10 million in annual revenue that aim to economically empower women. Since then, the platform has offered 300 distinct products from 28 small businesses from multiple countries, including Nepal, Tanzania and Kenya. On Mother’s Day in 2014, more than 2,600 Walmart stores sold products from the EWT assortment. In 2015, EWT will expand to encompass products from all WOBs, rather than exclusively small businesses. The new Women-Owned page at Walmart.com features products from certified WOBs and thousands of products featuring the new Women-Owned logo. In addition, the platform continues to sell products from inspiring nonprofit organizations and businesses that support the economic empowerment of marginalized women from all over the world.

8.4)   Improve progressively through 2030 global resource efficiency in consumption and production, and endeavor to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation in accordance with the 10-year framework of programmes on sustainable consumption and production with developed countries taking the lead

Walmart has worked with more than 100 suppliers, several leading NGOs and the scientists at The Sustainability Consortium (TSC) for the past several years to build the Sustainability Index. It’s a tool that gathers and analyzes information about a supplier’s approach to monitoring and managing social and environmental impact across the product life cycle – from sourcing, manufacturing and transporting to selling, customer usage and recycling. They’re putting this tool into the hands of our buyers and suppliers in the U.S., and piloting it in Chile and Mexico to drive continuous improvement and identify hot spots for special initiatives, such as factory energy efficiency and fertilizer optimization. Walmart is making information from the Index available to the public in the Sustainability Leaders shop at Walmart.com. The site describes the major hot spots affecting more than 80 product categories and showcases suppliers who score the highest on the Index in each category.  By the end of 2017, they’ll buy 70 percent of goods in Walmart U.S. and Sam’s Club U.S. units only from suppliers who use the Sustainability Index to evaluate and share the sustainability of their products if they produce goods in categories where the Index is available. Each merchant will have sustainability goals tied to his or her performance objectives and we will use the Index as the primary tool to measure progress.  Currently, nearly 1,300 suppliers are using the Sustainability Index to evaluate the sustainability performance of the full life cycle of their products, accounting for 65 percent of Walmart U.S. sales. They’re rolling the Sustainability Index out for Sam’s Club suppliers this year.

Goal 12: Ensure Sustainable Consumption & Production

12.5)   By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling, and reuse

The world generates an average of 3.5 million tons of solid waste per day. According to the World Bank Report, daily waste will climb to 6 million tons per day by 2025, and a staggering 11 million tons by 2100. Millions of tons of materials flow through Walmart facilities each year. They’re finding ways to reduce, reuse, recycle and manage them more efficiently, resulting in significant environmental and business upside. Ten years ago, they set an aspirational goal to create zero waste across our global operations.  They have achieved 82.4% of waste diversion in the U.S. and 68% internationally.

12.8)   By 2030, ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature

Walmart has worked with more than 100 suppliers, several leading NGOs and the scientists at The Sustainability Consortium (TSC) for the past several years to build the Sustainability Index. It’s a tool that gathers and analyzes information about a supplier’s approach to monitoring and managing social and environmental impact across the product life cycle – from sourcing, manufacturing and transporting to selling, customer usage and recycling. Walmart is putting this tool into the hands of our buyers and suppliers in the U.S., and piloting it in Chile and Mexico to drive continuous improvement and identify hot spots for special initiatives, such as factory energy efficiency and fertilizer optimization. Walmart is making information from the Index available to the public in the Sustainability Leaders shop at Walmart.com. The site describes the major hot spots affecting more than 80 product categories and showcases suppliers who score the highest on the Index in each category. By the end of 2017, they’ll buy 70 percent of goods in Walmart U.S. and Sam’s Club U.S. units only from suppliers who use the Sustainability Index to evaluate and share the sustainability of their products if they produce goods in categories where the Index is available. Each merchant will have sustainability goals tied to his or her performance objectives and we will use the Index as the primary tool to measure progress. Currently, nearly 1,300 suppliers are using the Sustainability Index to evaluate the sustainability performance of the full life cycle of their products, accounting for 65 percent of Walmart U.S. sales. Walmart is rolling the Sustainability Index out for Sam’s Club suppliers this year.

Goal 14: Conserve Oceans

14.b)   Provide access for small-scale artisanal fishers to marine resources and markets

Walmart’s commitment to sourcing sustainable seafood promotes collaborative efforts that bring together farmers, processors, importers, local governments, NGOs and manufacturers to develop region-specific fishery and aquaculture improvement projects. For example, National Fish & Seafood Inc., a Walmart supplier, has collaborated with the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership and Global Aquaculture Alliance to make it feasible for small farmers to become certified to globally recognized sustainability standards. Together, they’ve created the Small Farm Aquaculture Improvement Project (AIP), which assists scores of independent farmers in addressing important issues and achieving BAP certification.

14.c)   Enhance the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources by implementing international law as reflected in UNCLOS, which provides the legal framework for the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources, as recalled in paragraph 158 of The Future We Want

Walmart aspires to have 100 percent of its fresh, frozen, farmed and wild seafood to be third–party certified by Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) or Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP), or managing a program in accordance with the Principles of Credible Sustainability Programs developed by The Sustainability Consortium, or actively working toward certification, involved in a Fishery Improvement Project or Aquaculture Improvement Project in the U.S., U.K., Canada and Sam’s Club U.S.  To date, more than 90 percent of Walmart U.S, Sam’s Club U.S., Asda and Walmart Canada’s fresh and frozen, farmed and wild seafood is sustainably sourced in accordance with Walmart’s Seafood Policy (69 percent is certified by MSC and 95 percent of our farmed supply chain is certified by BAP).  Additionally, 15 percent of their supply is involved in Fishery Improvement Projects, with plans in place to achieve sustainable certification.